PASS Summit Pre-Con on Query Store

PASS has announced the pre-cons for this year’s Summit and I am *thrilled* to have the opportunity to present one centered around Query Store! This is a topic I’ve been presenting on since before SQL Server 2016 was released in June last year.  I’m ridiculously excited about it.  I’m already developing new content and demos – I hope I can fit everything I want to cover into one day!  (I bet you’re surprised that there will be demos 🙂  LOTS of demos!)

You can find the abstract here, and if you’re not sure if it’s right for you, please email me with your specific questions. There are a lot of great pre-cons available and I want to make sure that if you’re attending mine on Monday, October 30th, it’s the best fit for you. You’ll get the most from this pre-con if you are familiar with query plans, understand what’s in the plan cache, and can write basic T-SQL queries to find information.

I’m really looking forward to being at the Summit this year – and whether you attend any session I present or not, please introduce yourself if we haven’t met in person before!

PASS Summit 2015: The Recap

Another PASS Summit has ended, and again the days and evenings just flew by.  I’m not intending this to be a long-winded post, just some notes and a few highlights.  We’ll see how I do.

First, a huge thank you to those of you who attended my sessions on Wednesday.  I had wonderful crowds and great questions – it is such an honor to present at Summit, and I so enjoyed both sessions.  If you are looking for the decks and the scripts.  I have sent updated slide decks to PASS (I admit, I tweak them until the very end).  When they are uploaded you can pull them from the Summit site:

Kick and Screaming: Replacing Profiler with Extended Events

Statistics and Query Plans

As for the demos, they can be found on the SQLskills Resources page, under the PASS Summit 2015 section.  The link is also listed in the slide decks.

A few weeks ago I had mentioned that I was supporting Argenis Without Borders 2.0 by wearing a costume at Summit.  The cool news first: Argenis and Kirsten raised $25,000.  Yes I have the comma in the right place: TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS.  Ah-mazing.  As for my costume?  I went as Perry.  You may know that I take a stuffed Perry with me when I travel and take pictures of him to send to my kids, so why not dress up as him?  It was great, and huge thanks to Jes (Wonder Woman in the photo below) for the help.  Sadly, you can’t see my orange shoes in these pictures.

Argenis (as Ted) and me

Argenis (as Ted) and me

 

Wonder Woman and Perry, supporting Argenis Without Borders 2.0

Wonder Woman and Perry, supporting Argenis Without Borders 2.0

 

With my sessions finished on Wednesday, I had time on Thursday and Friday to catch up with friends, meet some new people, and sit in on some sessions.  There are some fantastic features coming in SQL Server 2016, and I’ll be making time over the next few months to start working with a few of them, as well as getting better acquainted with recently-released features that are starting to mature.  I am not at MVP Summit this week, which is a bummer on multiple levels.  However, I have been gone for three out of four weeks in October, and being away from my family for another week would have been a bigger bummer.  Life is about choices and balance 🙂

On a final note, I saw on Twitter that David Maxwell was the winner of Speaker Idol, meaning that he will present at the 2016 PASS Summit (to be held October 26-29, 2016).  David has worked hard over the last couple years – presenting at user groups and SQLSaturdays – steadily working to improve and hone his skills and style.  He is a great example of a community member that decided to step up and start speaking, and now he’ll have a spot at Summit next year.  Congratulations David!  And to those of you who have ever sat in a session and thought, “I could do that,” or “I would like to try that,” then let me ask you, “What are you waiting for?”  There are many people in the community who are willing to help new speakers (including me), but you need to take initiative and reach out to them when you’re ready.  Who knows, you could be speaking at Summit, or another conference, down the road.

For those of you that were at Summit, I hope you catch up on sleep and email in the next couple days, and I hope to see you again next year!

 

PASS Summit 2015: Women in Technology Luncheon

It’s Thursday at the PASS Summit so that means it’s time for the Women in Technology Luncheon.  As in years past (I’ve lost count of how many), the luncheon is sponsored by SQL Sentry.  The SQL Sentry team is here at Summit in full force, and I have Allen White at the blogger’s table with me.  But while I’m at it, let me give a shout out to a few members of the SQL Sentry team that have been supportive of not just this event, but of myself and some fellow colleagues.  These gentleman have provided feedback, suggestions, and good old fashioned support whenever asked or needed.  Thank you Aaron Bertrand, Kevin Kline, Nick Harshbarger, and Greg Gonzalez for all you do for me, my colleagues, and this community.

For those of you at home, you can watch the luncheon live on PASSTV.  Finally, if you want more rapid-fire commentary from the luncheon (as I’ll refresh this post every 5-10 minutes), I recommend following Mark Vaillancourt on Twitter (@markvsql).

Today’s luncheon features guest Angie Chang from Hackbright Academy, the VP of Strategic Partnerships, and we start with PASS Board VP of Marketing Denise McInerney welcoming us to today’s lunch (it’s the 13th one).

Angie starts by talking about her path from undergrad to her position today.  She started the Girl Geek Dinner chapter in San Francisco, and Hackbright sought her out to help celebrate the first graduating class of Hackbright.  Hackbright has graduated around 300 women over the past 3 years, and a few of those women now hold technical management positions.  Hackbright was started by some women who attended a coding camp.  The group started with an experiment of 12 women, teaching them to code in 10 weeks.  Since then they have grown the classes and the curriculum has evolved.  Right now teaching Python, and also teach some Java, Angular – they are taught to learn not just the language, but also ask questions.  Each engineering fellow has three mentors.  There are 100 software engineers who mentor those students for one hour a week.  This mentorship helps enhance the experience, and the students also get to visit other technical companies (e.g. Twitter, Dropbox).

Hackbright uses pair programming.  The community aspect is important – particularly because it’s an all-women environment.  The environment is very casual.  The students at Hackbright are very diverse and come from a variety of backgrounds.  Hackbright has a high rate of job placements.  Angie highlights some graduates of Hackbright who have been promoted to engineer management positions within their company.  SurveyMonkey has hired the most “Hackbright’s” of any company and one of the engineers is a manager there now.

Hackbright works with partner companies by inviting them to career day events and the Hackbright graduation.  Facebook sponsors a scholarship once a quarter, and Denise’s company, Intuit, also provides a scholarship.  Girl Geek Dinner started in London in about 2006, and Angie was working at a startup at that time.  Angie started up the Girl Geek Dinner in Mountain View, sponsored by Google – they had 400 people in 5 days.  They are booked into 2017 for dinners, with 2-3 per month.

Denise shifts to talking about the pipeline problem.  One Hackbright instructor, Rachel Thomas, wrote a post, If you think this is a pipeline issue then you haven’t been paying attention.  The article has suggestions for how to improve the pipeline – it’s not about getting women in, it’s about retaining them.  Denise asks Angie if she feels retention will be an issue for those graduating from Hackbright – and Angie states that they create a good network for each graduating engineer – their classmates at Hackbright, their mentors, etc. which gives each person a set of resources to turn when they’re struggling.

If you have questions you can come up to the microphone or use the #passwit hashtag on Twitter.

Documentary from Technovation called Codegirl which will stream on YouTube from November 1-5, check out the trailer.

Want to see if you have any unconscious biases?  Check out these tests on Harvard’s site.