Rereading the post about this from last night, it appears that I may have used an ambiguous analogy when attempting to figure why this feature works the way it does, and given folks the wrong idea. It has to do with whether the results of the query would be wrong or the query itself is “incorrect”. Using the invoice example from the previous post:

– this SQL query would fail to compile
SELECT invoice.query('
declare namespace inv = "urn:www-develop-com:invoices";
for $i in /fooelement
return <foo></foo>
')
FROM invoices

– this SQL query would compile, execute,
– and produce correct (but not schema-valid) results
SELECT invoice.query('
declare namespace inv = "urn:www-develop-com:invoices";
for $i in /inv:Invoice
return <foo></foo>
')
FROM invoices

The reason for this is that the SQL Server “query” method on SQL Server's XML data type always produces *untyped* XML by definition. So the first SQL statement fails because the query itself is wrong, not because the results would be incorrect.

In the analogy to SQL, the statement: “SELECT foo FROM invoices” fails not because there can't be a “foo” column in the output rowset but because selecting foo on the input in invalid. Actually, you can produce a “foo” column in the output:

SELECT invoiceid AS foo FROM invoices

so perhaps that wasn't such a bad analogy after all.