I mentioned this in my Anatomy of a page post – its a common misconception that records in an index are ALWAYS stored in the same physical order as the logical order defined by the index key. Here's proof for you that this is incorrect (as well as introducing you to the other dump styles for DBCC PAGE).

I'm going to create a table with a clustered index on an integer column and keep the table to a single page for simplicity:

USE MASTER;

GO

IF DATABASEPROPERTY (N'rowordertest', 'Version') > 0 DROP DATABASE rowordertest;

GO

CREATE DATABASE rowordertest;

GO

USE rowordertest;

GO

CREATE TABLE t1 (c1 INT, c2 VARCHAR (10));

CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX t1c1 ON t1 (c1);

GO

Now I'm going to insert a few rows into the table, with c1 from 2 to 5 – conspicuously not inserting c1 = 1:

INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (2, REPLICATE ('b', 10));

INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (3, REPLICATE ('c', 10));

INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (4, REPLICATE ('d', 10));

INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (5, REPLICATE ('e', 10));

GO

Now, using DBCC IND  we see that the data page is (1:143) and dumping that with DBCC PAGE gives the following (skipping the header output):

DBCC IND ('rowordertest', 't1', 1);

GO

DBCC TRACEON (3604);

GO

DBCC PAGE ('rowordertest', 1, 143, 3);

GO

Slot 0 Offset 0×60 Length 27

Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD         Record Attributes =  NULL_BITMAP VARIABLE_COLUMNS

Memory Dump @0x5BA3C060

00000000:   30000800 02000000 0300f802 0011001b †0……………
00000010:   00626262 62626262 626262†††††††††††††.bbbbbbbbbb
UNIQUIFIER = [NULL]  

Slot 0 Column 1 Offset 0×4 Length 4

c1 = 2

Slot 0 Column 2 Offset 0×11 Length 10

c2 = bbbbbbbbbb

<snip slots 1 and 2>                   

Slot 3 Offset 0xb1 Length 27

Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD         Record Attributes =  NULL_BITMAP VARIABLE_COLUMNS

Memory Dump @0x5BA3C0B1

00000000:   30000800 05000000 0300f802 0011001b †0……………
00000010:   00656565 65656565 656565†††††††††††††.eeeeeeeeee
UNIQUIFIER = [NULL]

Slot 3 Column 1 Offset 0×4 Length 4

c1 = 5

Slot 3 Column 2 Offset 0×11 Length 10

c2 = eeeeeeeeee

DBCC PAGE with dump-style 3 always outputs the records on a page in their logical order (because that's how the slot array is ordered). Notice that the record with c1 = 2 is stored at offset 0×60 in the page and the last record on the page with c1 = 5 is stored at offset 0xb1. Now we'll insert a record with c1 =1. This will become the first logical record in the index, but will it cause the page to be shuffled so the records can all be stored in logical order?

INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (1, REPLICATE ('a', 10));

GO

DBCC PAGE ('rowordertest', 1, 143, 3);

GO

Slot 0 Offset 0xcc Length 27

Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD         Record Attributes =  NULL_BITMAP VARIABLE_COLUMNS

Memory Dump @0x61FCC0CC

00000000:   30000800 01000000 0300f802 0011001b †0……………
00000010:   00616161 61616161 616161†††††††††††††.aaaaaaaaaa
UNIQUIFIER = [NULL]

Slot 0 Column 1 Offset 0×4 Length 4

c1 = 1

Slot 0 Column 2 Offset 0×11 Length 10

c2 = aaaaaaaaaa

Slot 1 Offset 0×60 Length 27

Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD         Record Attributes =  NULL_BITMAP VARIABLE_COLUMNS

<snip>

The answer is no. Even though the record with c1 =1 is output by DBCC PAGE first, look at its offset within the page – 0xCC – clearly the last record on the page and stored in a different physical order than the logical order defined by the index key. Further proof can be obtained by looking at a raw hex dump of the page using dump style 2 with DBCC PAGE:

DBCC PAGE ('rowordertest', 1, 143, 2);

GO

<snip>

6204C000:   01010400 00400001 00000000 00000800 †…..@……….
6204C010:   00000000 00000500 44000000 0f1fe700 †……..D…….
6204C020:   8f000000 01000000 13000000 60000000 †…………`…
6204C030:   16000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 †…………….
6204C040:   01000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 †…………….
6204C050:   00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 †…………….
6204C060:   30000800 02000000 0300f802 0011001b †0……………
6204C070:   00626262 62626262 62626230 00080003 †.bbbbbbbbbb0….
6204C080:   00000003 00f80200 11001b00 63636363 †…………cccc
6204C090:   63636363 63633000 08000400 00000300 †cccccc0………
6204C0A0:   f8020011 001b0064 64646464 64646464 †…….ddddddddd
6204C0B0:   64300008 00050000 000300f8 02001100 †d0…………..
6204C0C0:   1b006565 65656565 65656565 30000800 †..eeeeeeeeee0…
6204C0D0:   01000000 0300f802 0011001b 00616161 †………….aaa
6204C0E0:   61616161 61616100 00000000 00000000 †aaaaaaa………
6204C0F0:   00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 †…………….

<snip>

You can clearly see that the last row I inserted, with c1 = 1 and the replicated 'a's is stored after the other records on the page, even though its key is logically before the others.

And just to nail the point home, doing a dump style 1 with DBCC PAGE will dump out the slot array for us:

DBCC PAGE ('rowordertest', 1, 143, 1);

GO

<snip>

OFFSET TABLE:

Row – Offset
4 (0×4) – 177 (0xb1)
3 (0×3) – 150 (0×96)
2 (0×2) – 123 (0x7b)
1 (0×1) – 96 (0×60)
0 (0×0) – 204 (0xcc)

<snip>

The slot array grows backwards, which is why its dumped in what looks like reverse logical order. You can see that slot 0, which represents the first logical record on the page, is stored at an offset greater than the others.